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Luminescence

Project: Luminescence
Partners: ENS Cachan, PPSM
Commissioner: Scene de recherche

Luminescences is an immersive installation inviting visitors to visualise and perceive the phenomenon of mechano-luminescence and its impact in today’s word. What is luminescence and how is it created? What are its implications in material science? 

Year

2022

Sector

Interactive Installation

Discipline

Physics
Luminescence
Lighting Design
Interactive
Scenography
Chemistry

Ethos

Immersive
Dystopian
Interactive
Humane tech
Contemplative

” A display of the fragile equilibrium we are part of. ”

Chemistry is known to have an ambiguous relationship to the natural world, intuitively seen as a potential pollutant agent while being at the heart of processes fundamental in biology such as photosynthesis. Luminescent probes are unique in their role and can effectively be used as markers of unbalance and disharmony in the natural world.

PPSM research groups develop probes that can detect pollution in air and water, with cascading effects so that an extremely small amount of pollutants triggers a strong signal. Like the most beautiful yet poisonous flower, luminescence has an incredible and mesmerising visual quality. Whilst it is doing its job of warning us of catastrophe we cannot help but wait to see the next volute and shape it will create, like a living creature with an agency of its own. 

“Each column has its own microcosm and chaos phenomenon 

As the butterfly effect, luminescence is showing us how a single drop and the smallest action can create an unpredictable fragile, and always evolving event.  

Each column is being invaded by its own microcosm, shapes and geometries. Luminescences act as a metaphor for our relationship to the environment, and a reveal of the fragility of the ecosystem we live in everyday. With a loop of 10mn soundscape, audiences can decide to stay and activate the next ‘burst’ of action, or notice as they are taking their distance that the system regains an equilibrium, with underwater species being born of most balanced and harmonious shape. 

Creative direction: Salome Bazin
Sound design : Bart Belleudy
Computing assistant: Yildiz Bliss
Scientific advisor: Clemence Allain
Footage: Maxime Tissot
Thanks to the help of Scene de Recherche team. Support from PPSM Lab. 

Collaborative science

Body Technology

Interactive Architecture

We believe that learning from diversity enhances our creativity, and improves our work as designers and scientists.
Collaborative science means that a system or environment is designed with the knowledge and sensitivity of non experts and poetic mindset. A collaborative design process allows to mobilise a wider range of information, ideas and insights to address a broader social challenge and prevents major biases that could occur from a scientific-engineer centric approach.

By ‘body technology’, we encompass two notions: embodied computing and cognitive science, which have been interlacing in our projects.
Body centered technologies point to hybrid bodies and blurr boundaries between human, computer and artificial platforms. Such technologies promise to reconfigure the relationship between bodies and their environment, enabling new kinds of physiological interfacing. The latter is the science of cognition: how the human brain thinks, learns, organises itself. It seeks to understand the principles of intelligence and behaviour, individually and collectively.
Computer/human collaboration is an emerging trend in science as well as artistic disciplines (dance, music, performance).

Interactive architecture is the art/science of creating spaces and buildings that interact with their visitors. By incorporating sensors, processors and effectors in the core of the architecture,we can create intelligent spaces that acquire the ability to gather information from the physical space, understand it and act in consequence on it. This allows architects to create a real-time, personalised interaction between a space and its visitors – between a smart object and a smart subject. For us designers, they become a vector for interactive art. We aim to create ‘spaces’ that respond to our presence and help us understand complex notions of the physical and natural world that we are constantly interacting with.

Computational Cardiology

Computational cardiology is the use of advanced imaging, genetic screening and devices to understand heart conditions and to treat patients according to their specific pathophysiology. Cardiologists use computational models that analyse great amounts of patient-specific physiological and physical information, to reveal diagnostic information and predict clinical outcomes, which enables personalising treatment for individuals.
Scanning technologies (MRI, CT, Echocardiography) are widely used, non invasive technique to create detailed images of organs and tissue in the body using strong magnetic fields or ultrasound to create 2D or 3D imagery.

Big Data

Big Data is the science of processing data that is too large, fast and complex to be analysed using traditional methods. With the advent of the internet and the internet of things, computers are dealing with extremely large quantities of data arriving in at an extremely fast rate and in a variety of complex formats (numbers, text, audio, video…). Big data seeks to capture, store and extract information from these kinds of data, with acceptable results and in an acceptable time. It englobes fields like statistical analysis and machine learning. Data analysis can help predict business trends, streamline user experiences, or build complex models of an individual’s hearts!
The paradigm shift in surgery is to plan the best healthcare provision adapted to our specific biological architecture and machinery. The combination of medical imagery with machine learning and omics science target for a better understanding of individuals as well as population health.

Interactive Architecture

Interactive architecture is the art/science of creating spaces and buildings that interact with their visitors. By incorporating sensors, processors and effectors in the core of the architecture,we can create intelligent spaces that acquire the ability to gather information from the physical space, understand it and act in consequence on it. This allows architects to create a real-time, personalised interaction between a space and its visitors – between a smart object and a smart subject. For us designers, they become a vector for interactive art. We aim to create ‘spaces’ that respond to our presence and help us understand complex notions of the physical and natural world that we are constantly interacting with.